OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

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* Certain programs within the School of Health Professions apply through centralized application services. Please read more about your program of interest prior to applying through the LIU Brooklyn Admissions website.

Holly Wasserman, EdD, OTR/L, CAPS
Program Director, Associate Professor Department of Occupational Therapy
Pratt Building, Room 225

  718-780-4508
  holly.wasserman@liu.edu
  bkln-OT@liu.edu

Occupational Therapy


Occupational therapy is a vital area of the healthcare profession with enormous scope and increasing opportunity. Occupational therapy is the use of self-care, work/productive tasks and play/leisure activities to increase independent function, enhance development, and prevent disability. Occupational therapists help people across age and disability overcome physical, mental, emotional, and developmental issues and perform the everyday tasks and functions of life. 

LIU Brooklyn's Occupational Therapy programs are is designed to educate entry-level occupational therapists whose skills and training prepare them to practice competently in the rapidly changing urban health care environment and to equip patients and clients with skills for the workplace and for home.

The Occupational Therapy curriculum offers students the opportunity to focus on individual professional growth, to participate in community-service learning, to refine cultural sensitivity and practice skills, to use health promotion in community settings, to utilize activity to promote health and independence, and to develop the skills required to treat the whole person.

A master's degree or higher in occupational therapy from an academic program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE®) is required in order to practice. Graduates need to pass the national certification exam (NBCOT exam) before applying for licensure in any state. 

Please visit https://secure.nbcot.org/data/schoolstats.aspx to see program results from the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT).


The Department of Occupational Therapy at the Brooklyn Campus offers a 122-credit B.S./M.S. degree in Occupational Therapy, that is approved by the New York State Education Department and the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). Prior to entering the professional phase of the program, students must complete the liberal arts and sciences core curriculum (64 credits), which offers a comprehensive base of sciences, humanities and social sciences. The professional phase of the program spans three years of full-time professional academic courses and clinical work that is integrated with several community-service learning experiences.

The program is designed to educate entry-level occupational therapists whose skills and training prepare them to practice competently in the rapidly changing health care environment. Faculty members are actively involved in promoting community health and wellness through funded research and through programs that assist people in achieving their highest level of functioning within the context of their own communities. From their first year in the program, occupational therapy students are involved in these activities as part of their training.

The B.S./M.S. curriculum offers students enriched opportunities to focus on individual, professional growth; to participate in community service learning; to refine cultural sensitivity and evidence-based practice skills. Our students engage in health promotion in community settings and develop clinical skills to treat the whole person. Students’ clinical experiences include the development of comprehensive treatment plans based on the person’s occupational roles, including physical, cognitive and psychosocial needs and the use of the person’s occupations and activities to promote health and independence.

The program stresses the use of a variety of teaching methods and the integration of technology in the coursework that allows students to develop a comprehensive understanding of practice and to build their research skills. Embedded in the curriculum are activities that enhance students’ communication and critical thinking, while preparing them for successful clinical careers and leadership roles with their professional community. A comprehensive enrichment program spans throughout the curriculum to support students’ academic excellence and professional development, fostering growth for students from diverse socio-economic and cultural backgrounds.

Our clinical education is comprehensive and extensive. We offer four (4) Fieldwork I affiliations in geriatrics, mental health (traditional and emerging wellness community settings), physical disabilities and pediatrics. We also offer three (3) Fieldwork II level affiliations in mental health, physical disabilities and pediatrics. Our faculty works closely with our clinical educators in the field to ensure a high quality of clinical experiences for all students.


Mission

The mission of the Department of Occupational Therapy at LIU Brooklyn is to prepare excellent health professionals from diverse sociocultural backgrounds. Our graduates will demonstrate mastery of complex skills, knowledge, attitudes and values reflecting best practices based on scientific evidence, sensitive to the needs of diverse communities. As graduates, these occupational therapists will provide skillful care grounded in the art and science of ethical and reflective practice recognizing the inherent dignity and cultural background of all people. The recipient of occupational therapy services will be engaged as an active participant in the therapeutic process of adaptation and change. Our graduates will promote health and well-being through intervention employing occupation that is meaningful to each individual. They will adhere to the highest professional standards guided by humanistic and ethical values and an appreciation of scientific inquiry. They will use scientific evidence and research findings to inform their clinical decisions. They will assume roles as advocates with patients, consumers, other therapists, health professionals and members of the community and they will actively support and promote the profession of Occupational Therapy.

Accreditation

For further information regarding accreditation please refer directly to ACOTE in the following address:

ACOTE
c/o Accreditation Department
American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA)
4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200
Bethesda, MD 20814-3449
www.aota.org/Education-Careers/Accreditation.aspx

Accredited by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE). 

Accreditation Information

Our program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE), American Occupational Therapy Association. The corresponding Web address is www.aota.org/Education-Careers/Accreditation.aspx. They can also be contacted at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD, 20814-3449, telephone 301-652-2682.

Our Department received initial accreditation in 2001. Our department has recently (August 20, 2012) received re-accreditation for 10 years.  Our next accreditation cycle is 2022.  As the Department is fully accredited, graduates are eligible to sit for the National Certification Examination for the Occupational Therapist, administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) (www.nbcot.org). After successful completion of this exam, the graduate becomes an Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). Most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the successful completion of the NBCOT Certification Examination.

Students seeking the entrance into health and human service professions should be aware that the presence of a criminal record can result in the refusal of licensing/certification/registration agencies to issue the credential needed to practice in the field of study. Prospective students are urged to contact the pertinent state and/or federal licensing board to inquire whether a criminal record will have an impact on your eligibility to obtain licensure or certification. Students are also advised to seek further information at: National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, 800 S. Frederick Avenue, Suite 200, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20877-4150, telephone 301-990-7979.

Any formal complaints against Long Island University Occupational Therapy Program may be submitted in writing directly to the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) Chairperson, c/o the AOTA Accreditation Department, at the following address: 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814-3449

NBCOT pass rate

Consistent with the Centennial Vision of our Profession (www.aota.org) , our Department has developed an enrichment program to facilitate successful professional development for students from diverse socio-cultural backgrounds. The total number of graduates who passed the National Board for Certification Exam (more information at www.NBCOT.org) within one year of graduation is presented on the following table.

For program performance data please visit https://secure.nbcot.org/data/schoolstats.aspx

NBCOT Pass rate chart

Year
Number of Graduates Testing
Number of New Graduates Passing Exam Within One Year of Graduation
Percentage of New Graduates Passing Exam Within One  Year of Graduation
 
2014
63
59
94%
2015
47
46
98%
2016
51
51
100%
Over 3-year period
161
156
97.3%

Graduation Rates

Our combined B.S. /M.S program is completed in three full years, inclusive of Level II Fieldwork. Students enter the program in September and graduate at the end of their 3rd year, in September.

The below chart outlines the percentage of students who have completed the program in the intended three years. These figures take into account students who may have withdrawn from the program for personal reasons.

Graduation Class # of students who began their studies expected to graduate in 3 years # of students who graduated within 3 years % of students who graduated within 3 years.
Class of 2016 54 48 89%
Class of 2015 54 50 93%
Class of 2014 61 51 84%
Total 169 149 87%


Admission

Our program presents an excellent opportunity for high school students who want to pursue a degree in Occupational Therapy. High school students can complete a B.S./M.S. degree in Occupational Therapy in 5 years (2 years for the completion of the pre-requisites and 3 years for the professional phase of the program). Our program also presents a great opportunity for college students and college graduates with a degree in another field who want to pursue a career in Occupational Therapy.

Students seeking the entrance into health and human service professions should be aware that the presence of a criminal record can result in the refusal of licensing/certification/registration agencies to issue the credential needed to practice in the field of study. Prospective students are urged to contact the pertinent state and/or federal licensing board to inquire whether a criminal record will have an impact on your eligibility to obtain licensure or certification. A criminal conviction and/or the use of illegal drugs may impede licensure in New York State. Students who have had a prior conviction are advised to contact NBCOT (www.nbcot.org) for clearance before beginning their academic program. For a fee, NBCOT will review the circumstances which led to a conviction and the individual’s personal record and render a decision concerning whether or not the individual would qualify to work as an occupational therapist.

For more information regarding the LIU Occupational Therapy Program please email bkln-OT@liu.edu

Admission Requirements:

Students must have a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 on a scale of 4.0. A 3.0 minimum cumulative grade-point average also is preferred in the prerequisite science courses in order to be considered for an interview.

  • Overall GPA is determined by evaluating all transcripts and courses taken during your undergraduate studies.
  • Overall GPA would need to be a 3.0 in both areas at the time of the admission committee’s review (January-February) in order to be considered for an interview

  • If your overall GPA does not meet the above criteria consideration for an interview will be determined after all eligible candidates have been evaluated/interviewed and based on class seat availability.

  • Your science GPA is determined by looking at your grades for the four science courses we require. (BIO 3, BIO 4, A & PI and A & P II). If you repeated any science course and took it at the same institution, the higher grade will replace the lower grade for the GPA calculations. If you repeated the course at a different institution then both grades are averaged in the GPA.

  • Science grades more than 10 years old are not acceptable.

  • Any repeated science courses will be noted on your application and will be taken into consideration during final selection.

Information for High School Students

High school students must have a minimum high school average of 85 and a minimum combined SAT score of 1000 to apply as a Pre-Occupational Therapy candidate. They must complete 64 credits of prerequisite course prior to entering the professional phase of the program. An application to the program is necessary, please “Application Process for LIU students” for more details.

In order to maintain status as a Pre-Occupational Therapy candidate and to apply to the professional phase of the program, students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 in liberal arts and sciences courses (grades below a C are not acceptable in prerequisite courses).

Application Process (LIU Students)

Current students are required to provide the following items when submitting their application or your application cannot be processed

-  Department of Occupational Therapy Application (must be filled out completely) and signed.

  • You can apply directly to the Department of OT at Long Island University.  Admission application and reference letter forms can be obtained from the OT Department (2nd floor of the Pratt Building, 718-780-4508)
  • 3 letters of recommendation on the designated reference forms of the Department (these forms can be obtained from the Department of OT.)
    - These are the only forms that we will accept.
  • Your application will not be considered for an interview until all three reference letters are received and written on our specific forms. Evaluators may choose to provide a written letter however this letter is only in addition to the information on the back of the recommendation form.
  • We request that letters of recommendation be completed by people who know you well—for example, college professors, academic counselors, and/or employers, and by at least one occupational therapist.
  • The person completing the recommendation form MUST return it to you in a sealed envelope with his or her signature across the flap of the envelope.
  • You should collect all sealed envelopes and submit them together along with your application to the Department of Occupational Therapy.

- Personal statement

  • In your personal statement explain your career goals, your interest in occupational therapy, past work/volunteer experience that is relevant, and if there is a specialized area of occupational therapy that interests you most. You may also wish to describe your experience with illness and disability—whether the experience is your own or that of a family member or close friend.

-  Verification of a minimum of 50 hours of volunteer work with a licensed occupational therapist. . 50 hours is the minimum requirement and should be completed by the application deadline. It is recommended that candidates engage in more than the minimum hours and in more than one setting. We are requiring that verification of these hours are provided. Candidates need to submit a letter from the occupational therapist or the facility confirming their volunteer work.

- Curriculum Vitae

We recommend you mail in or bring in all items of your application together.

The Mailing address for the department is:

Long Island University, Brooklyn Campus
1 University Plaza, Pratt 2nd Floor
Brooklyn, NY, 11201
Attention: Department of Occupational Therapy

Interview

Due the competitive nature of the program unfortunately only eligible students will be invited for an interview. The following criteria will be considered to determine eligibility for an interview:

  • Meeting application deadline
  • Cumulative GPA as well as Science GPA
  • Volunteer experience and extracurricular activities
  • Writing competency (personal statement, curriculum vitae)
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Leadership Positions
  • Research Populations
  • Curriculum Vitae

For more information regarding the LIU Occupational Therapy Program please email bkln-OT@liu.edu

 

Application Process (Transfer Student)

All applicants can submit their application for admissions while they are in the final stage of the completion of their prerequisite courses. All prerequisites must be completed prior to entering the professional phase of the program.

The Department of Occupational Therapy accepts transfer students with or without a degree. Transfer students need to apply to the program via:

The OTCAS system: www.otcas.org.
Application Deadline: January 8, 2018
Long Island University uses the Occupational Therapy Centralized Application Service (OTCAS).

Please visit https://portal.otcas.org/ to create your OTCAS account.

All official transcripts should be sent directly to OTCAS:

Occupational Therapy Centralized Application Service (OTCAS)

P.O. Box 9120
Watertown, MA 02471


Phone: 617–612–2860
Email: otcasinfo@otcas.org
Website: http://portal.otcas.org/

Where to Send Your Application:

OTCAS must receive the application, references, and transcripts well before the deadline listed above in order to be VERIFIED in time for consideration. Once your application is complete, OTCAS will verify your documents before releasing them to Long Island University. Please note that Long Island University cannot access unverified applications. Applicants should confirm their status as verified with OTCAS.

  • For any questions about the receipt, processing, and verification of your application, please contact OTCAS Customer Service at 617-612-2860, otcasinfo@otcas.org.
  • For other questions, please contact the Long Island University OT Office at bkln-OT@liu.edu or 718-780-4508.

No supplemental application is required.

Please note, only verified OTCAS applications can be considered for interviews. Please allow 2-6 weeks (depending on time of year) for OTCAS and the respective institutions to send/review/verify your transcripts once they are received. In other words, applications need to be VERIFIED by the deadline listed above in order to have priority consideration. Any applications verified after the application deadline will be reviewed once all other applications have been reviewed and class seating permits.

International students must submit an international evaluation and translation for all international transcripts to OTCAS. These transcripts must be evaluated by a NACES accredited organization and must be submitted by the application deadline. Students must also alert the OT department of such transcripts by emailing bkln-ot@liu.edu. Incomplete applications will not be considered for an interview.

Students are required to provide the following items when submitting their application or your application cannot be processed. Incomplete applications will not be considered for an interview.

3 letters of recommendation

  • Your application will not be considered complete until all three reference letters are on file with OTCAS by the deadline.
  • We REQUEST that letters of recommendation be completed by people who know you well—for example, college professors, academic counselors, and/or employers and by at least one occupational therapist.

Personal statement

  • In your personal statement explain your career goals, your interest in occupational therapy, past work/volunteer experience that is relevant, and if there is a specialized area of occupational therapy that interests you most. You may also wish to describe your experience with illness and disability—whether the experience is your own or that of a family member or close friend.

Verification of a minimum of 50 hours of volunteer work with a licensed occupational therapist (uploaded to OTCAS)

  • 50 hours is the minimum requirement and should be completed by the application deadline for full consideration.
  • It is recommended that candidates engage in more than the minimum hours and in more than one setting.
  • We require that verification of these hours are provided. Please make sure documentation is submitted to OTCAS for all hours for consideration. A letter or a log of hours signed by the OTR is fine.

Curriculum Vitae (uploaded to OTCAS)

INTERVIEW

Due the competitive nature of the program unfortunately only eligible students will be invited for an interview. The following criteria will be considered to determine eligibility for an interview:
·  Meeting application deadline with a Verified Application
·  Cumulative GPA as well as Science GPA
·  Volunteer experience and extracurricular activities
·  Writing competency (personal statement, curriculum vitae)
·  Letters of recommendation
·  Leadership positions
·  Research Participation
·  Curriculum Vitae

For more information or for questions regarding the LIU Occupational Therapy Program please email bkln-OT@liu.edu

Prerequisites

All accepted students begin the program in the fall semester. All prerequisite courses must be completed prior to entering the programs. The following are the pre-requisite courses for all internal and transfer students WITHOUT A DEGREE:

PREREQUISITE COURSES FOR STUDENTS WITHOUT A DEGREE
Biology (Bio 1 or 3, 2 or 4, General Biology 1 & 2)

8 cr

Anatomy with lab (Bio 131 or Bio 137, A & P I)

4 cr

Physiology (Bio 132 or Bio 138, A & P II)

3 cr

Statistics

3 cr

College Math (Math 16, Algebra or higher)

3 cr

General Psy (Psy 3)

3 cr

Developmental Psy (Psy 107)

3 cr

Abnormal Psy (Psy 110)

3 cr

English Composition (Eng 16, Core Seminar)

6 cr

English Literature (Eng 61-64)

6 cr

History (His 1, 2)

6 cr

Philosophy (Phil 61, 62)

6 cr

Oral Communication (Spe 3)

3 cr

Introduction to Sociology/Anthropology

3 cr

Liberal Arts course (s)

4 cr*

Total

64 credits

*Each applicant is required to complete 4 credits of liberal arts or science course work. We will accept OS 1 (for internal students) for one credit and 3 credits from an elective course. Computer science, education and physical education courses are not acceptable for completion of the liberal arts and science requirement. The total number of prerequisite credits required for graduation is 64 credits. All prerequisite course work must be completed prior to initiation of professional phase course work.

The following are the pre-requisite courses for all internal and transfer students WITH A DEGREE.

To transfer into the program with a two-year associates or a four-year bachelor’s degree, a student must have completed a minimum of 64 acceptable liberal arts and sciences credits including:

TRANSFER STUDENTS WITH A DEGREE
Biology (Bio 1 or 3, 2 or 4, General Biology 1 & 2)

8 cr

Anatomy with lab (Bio 131 or Bio 137, A & P I)

4 cr

Physiology (Bio 132 or Bio 138, A & P II)

3 cr

Statistics

3 cr

College Math (Math 16, Algebra or higher)

3 cr

General Psy (Psy 3)

3 cr

Developmental Psy (Psy 107)

3 cr

Abnormal Psy (Psy 110)

3 cr

English Composition (Eng 16)

3 cr

English Literature (Eng 61-64)

3 cr

Introduction to Sociology/Anthropology

3 cr

Total

39 credits

A total of 64 credits is required for entry into the program. Completion of 25 additional required credits in liberal arts and sciences course work must be evident on the student’s transcript (computer science, education and physical education courses are not acceptable for the liberal arts and sciences requirement).

Program Requirements

Continued enrollment in this program is contingent upon:

  • Maintaining a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0 on a scale of 4.0 per semester throughout the professional phase of the program.
  • Adhering to the AOTA Code of Ethics and the professional behavior standards in all interactions with faculty members, peers, clinical instructors and clients.


Technical Standards

To the extent that OT Graduates will be expected to function as autonomous practitioners and to provide a full range of occupational therapy services, the Department of Occupational Therapy has established minimum standards for participation and progression in the program. Individuals who complete the program are eligible to sit for the National Board of Certification in Occupational Therapy Exam, apply for state licensure and entry into the profession of occupational therapy. In order to effectively participate and progress in the didactic and clinical portions of the program, students must possess certain skills, which are outlined here.

Course Sequence

The developmental nature of our curriculum allows students to be introduced, practice and master, core competencies pertaining to the clinical practice of Occupational Therapy. The curriculum is brought to life through organizing strands, which serve to infuse the mission and philosophy of the program into each course. The courses are organized into sequences that aim to gradually enable students’ learning and professional competency.

The organizing strands for the curriculum are:

  • Clinical reasoning/evidence-based practice/research
  • Engagement in meaningful occupation
  • Health promotion, prevention and wellness
  • Professional socialization/community service

The occupational therapy program will allow you to:

  • Focus on your individual professional growth and development
  • Participate in community service learning
  • Enhance cultural sensitivity and practice skills
  • Use health promotion in community settings
  • Develop skills to treat the whole person including physical, cognitive and psychosocial needs
  • Use purposeful activity to promote health and independence
  • Prepare for a successful career and leadership roles within the Occupational Therapy profession.

The following charts present the full-time curriculum distributed across the three years:

FIRST YEAR

FALL
OT 100

Introduction to Occupational Therapy

2 cr

OT 106

Therapeutic Skills 1: Interpersonal Skills

2 cr

OT 110

Human Development & Occupation 1: Pediatrics

3 cr

OT 140

Neuroscience

5 cr

OT 201

Professional Development 1: OT Student Academic Experience

2 cr

OT 301

Skills For Living 1: Play and Leisure

3 cr

 

 

17 credits

SPRING
OT 111

Human Development & Occupation 2: Adolescence

2 cr

OT 119

Anatomy

5 cr

OT 120

Theory 1: Introduction

2 cr

OT 202

Professional Development 2: Communication Skills

1 cr

OT 203

Professional Development 3: Advocacy & Disability Perspectives

1 cr

OT 206

Therapeutic Skills 2: Group Process

3 cr

 

 

14 credits

SUMMER
OT 112

Human Development & Occupation 2: Geriatrics

2 cr

OT 121

Medical Conditions 1: Physical Disabilities

3 cr

OT 129

Kinesiology

4 cr

OT 220

Theory 2: Learning Theories

2 cr

OT 302

Skills For Living 2: Work

3 cr

 

 

14 credits

SECOND YEAR

FALL
OT 122

Medical Conditions 2: Mental Health

3 cr

OT 200

Fieldwork Level I: Geriatrics

1 cr

OT 303

Skills for Living 3: Self-Care

3 cr

OT 306

Therapeutic Skills 3: Teamwork & Leadership

2 cr

OT 320

Comprehensive Models/ Mental Health Practice Guidelines

4 cr

OT 420

Theory 4: Physical Disability Guidelines for Practice

5 cr

 

 

18 credits

SPRING
OT 205

Professional Development 5: Health Promotion

1 cr

OT 210

Fieldwork Level I: Mental Health

1 cr

OT 215

Fieldwork Level I: Physical Disability

1 cr

OT 330

Practice 1: Mental Health

5 cr

OT 430

Practice 2: Neurorehabilitation

5 cr

OT 431

Practice 3: Ortho Rehab/Splint Fabrication

4 cr

 

 

17 credits

SUMMER
OT 432

Practice 4: Medical and Surgical Rehabilitation

2 cr

OT 506

Therapeutic Skills 5: Technology

2 cr

OT 520

Theory 5: Research

3 cr

OT 533

Medical Conditions 3: Pediatrics

3 cr

OT 620

Theory 6: Research Proposal

2 cr

OT 720

Theory 7: Community Practice & Health Promotion

2 cr

 

 

14 credits

FALL
OT 507

Therapeutic Skills 6: Organization & Administration

3 cr

OT 510

Fieldwork Level II: Mental Health

5 cr

OT 530

Practice 5: Pediatrics

5 cr

OT 535

Fieldwork Level I: Pediatrics

1 cr

OT 716

Professional Development 6: OT Student Clinical Experience

1 cr

 

 

15 credits

SPRING
OT 511

Fieldwork Level II: Physical Disability

5 cr

OT 512

Fieldwork Level II: Pediatrics

4 cr

OT 513

Elective Fieldwork Level II

2-4 cr

OT 820

Theory 8: Capstone Research Project

4 cr

 

 

13(-17) credits

Curriculum Goals

The academic program enables the graduate to:

  • Demonstrate professional knowledge behaviors and work habits appropriate to the setting and the graduate’s level of professional development.
  • Demonstrate values and attitudes that are consistent with the occupational therapy profession, its standards and ethics.
  • Establish and maintain rapport and helping relationships with patients, clients and, as appropriate, families, significant others and caregivers. Students demonstrate occupation-based, client-oriented and culturally competent practices.
  • Demonstrate competence in professional relationships with staff, peers, supervisors and supervisees, students, team members, representatives of clinical and community settings and the public.
  • Demonstrate competence in patient/client observation, basic reporting skills, and an ability to effectively use oral, nonverbal and written communication skills.
  • Demonstrate the ability to develop and implement evidence-based practice skills. Specifically, demonstrate basic screening, assessment, treatment, reassessment and discharge planning skills.
  • Relate recommendations for treatment goals, activities and practice approaches based on the use of meaningful occupation relevant to patient/client needs, level of life span development, through theoretical principals, clinical reasoning, and effective practice skills.
  • Apply principles of health promotion and disease prevention in practice and consultation.
  • Effectively present the role of occupational therapy intervention and consultation in traditional and emerging areas of practice in the urban environment and the community.

Identify themselves as members of the occupational therapy profession with a commitment to continuing development in practice, clinical and community involvement, advocacy, management, evidence-based practice and research.

Clinical Education

Community Service

Students will be prepared to ultimately work in the urban environment, which presents unique challenges to health care provision. Consistent with the mission of Long Island University’s Brooklyn Campus to provide service to the community, occupational therapy students will participate in the Common Ground, a unique community service-learning program sponsored by the University. The curriculum emphasizes the importance of community service learning, cultural competence and the relationship of the environment to health and illness. It is critical that students have early and consistent exposure to the community facilitated through developmental learning activities. The community-based learning experiences will foster a deep appreciation of the broad spectrum of social, cultural, political, and economic forces that shape this environment and influence the individual in his/her daily activities and valued occupations.

During the course of the curriculum, students will have three placements in the community, and will participate in a capstone project in which they will develop a research project that promotes occupational therapy in a community setting or emerging practice area. This project will contribute to the goal of the occupational therapy educational program to prepare students who can effectively work in traditional and nontraditional settings (including health, social, and community agencies addressing health promotion, disease prevention and rehabilitation needs).

Fieldwork Education

Clinical practice constitutes an integral part of the course of study.¬ It provides an excellent opportunity for students to acclimate themselves to the health care setting, practice selected aspects of occupational therapy, observe various types of health care settings, and develop your professional competence.

The clinical practice component begins with a ten week clinical experience in the fall of the second professional year.¬ The following clinical practice experiences gradually become more demanding and varied in nature.¬ The program concludes in clinical internships with a minimum of 28 weeks in the fall/spring/summer semesters of your final graduate year at the Brooklyn Campus (at which time students will be responsible for providing all occupational therapy services to their own caseload, under the supervision of licensed occupational therapists).

Many of our clinical/field experience affiliates now require the completion of criminal background checks and/or drug testing for employees, volunteers and students affiliated with the site. Therefore, the Brooklyn Campus students who plan to participate in a clinical/field experience may be asked to undergo a criminal background check and/or drug screen. A criminal conviction and/or the use of illegal drugs may impede or bar your entry into your chosen field of study. Students desiring entrance into the School of Health Professions should be aware that our clinical/field affiliates can reject or remove a student from the site if criminal record is discovered or if a drug test is positive. In the event that a student is rejected from a clinical/field site due to information contained in the criminal background check, or drug screen, you may be unable to complete a required clinical/field experience. If you are unable to complete program requirements, you may be advised to withdraw from the program.

Faculty and Administrators

Program Director

Holly Wasserman EdD, OTR/L, CAPS
Associate Professor
Phone (718) 780-4510/ Fax (718) 780-4535
Pratt 225
holly.wasserman@liu.edu

Administrators

Dale Coffin, MS, OTR/L, CAPS
Associate Professor
Evening/Weekend Program Coordinator 
Phone (718) 780-6530/ Fax (718) 780-4535
Pratt 226
dale.coffin@liu.edu

Mechelle Collins, MS, OTR/L
Assistant Professor
Academic Fieldwork Coordinator
Phone (718) 246-6371/ Fax (718) 780-4535
Pratt 227
mechelle.collins@liu.edu

Eitaysha Weems
Department Secretary
Phone (718) 780-4508/ Fax (718) 780-4535
Pratt 224
eitaysha.weems@liu.edu

Faculty

Marta Daly, OTD, OTR/L
Assistant Professor
Phone (718) 780-6532/ Fax (718) 780-4535
Pratt 223
marta.daly@liu.edu

Lisa Gordon-Handler, Ph.D., OTR/L
Assistant Professor
Phone (718) 780-4605/ Fax (718) 780-4535
Pratt 219
lisa.gordon@liu.edu

Efekona Nuwere, M.S., OTR/L, ATP
Assistant Professor
Academic Fieldwork Coordinator
Phone (718) 780-3403/ Fax (718) 780-4535
Pratt 220
efekona.nuwere@liu.edu

Doris Obler, Ph.D., MSW, OTR/L
Associate Professor
718/780-4509/ Fax (718) 780-4535
Pratt 218
doris.obler@liu.edu

Keith Peterson, PT, DPT
Assistant Professor
718/780-4508/ Fax (718) 780-4535
Pratt 221
keith.peterson@liu.edu

Michael Saraceno, MS, OTR/L, CHT
Associate Professor
(718) 780-4123/ Fax (718) 780-4535
Pratt 222
michael.saraceno@liu.edu

Amiya Waldman-Levi, PhD., OTR/L
Associate Professor
(718) 780-4332/ Fax (718) 780-4535
Pratt 217
amiya.waldman-levi@liu.edu

Background Check and Drug Testing

A criminal conviction and/or the use of illegal drugs may impede or bar your entry into the field of occupational therapy. Students desiring entrance into the LIU OT Program should be aware that the presence of a criminal record can result in the refusal of licensing/certification/registration agencies to issue the credential needed to practice in the field of study. Prospective students are urged to contact the pertinent state and/or federal licensing board to inquire whether a criminal record will have an impact on their eligibility to obtain licensure or certification. A criminal conviction and/or the use of illegal drugs may impede licensure in New York State. Students who have had a prior conviction are advised to contact NBCOT (www.nbcot.org) for clearance before beginning an academic program. For a fee, NBCOT will review the circumstances which led to a conviction and the individual’s personal record and render a decision concerning whether or not the individual would qualify to work as an occupational therapist

In addition, many of our clinical/field experience affiliates now require the completion of criminal background checks and/or drug testing for employees, volunteers and students affiliated with the site. LIU OT students are required to participate in multiple clinical/field experiences and may be asked to undergo a criminal background check and/or drug screen by the site. A criminal conviction and/or the use of illegal drugs may impede or bar your ability to participate in a clinical/field experience, delay graduation and/or prevent you from completing the program. Our clinical/field affiliates can reject or remove a student from the site if a criminal record is discovered or if a drug test is positive. In the event that a student is rejected from a clinical/field site due to information contained in the criminal background check, or drug screen, you may be unable to complete a required clinical/field experience. If you are unable to complete program requirements, you may be advised to withdraw from the program.

Open Houses

Visit us for an in-depth look of our combined B.S./M.S. degree in Occupational Therapy. Learn about admissions and program requirements, meet with faculty and staff, and find out where our successful alumni are practicing in the public and private sectors.

When: October 17, 2017
Time: 5:00-7:00
Where: TBD

Registration for the event will be available in October.

PROFESSIONAL OUTLOOK

The need for occupational therapists is expected to increase as baby boomers age and increasing numbers of children are diagnosed with developmental disorders. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects occupational therapist employment growth of 29 percent between 2012 and 2022.

WHY LIU BROOKLYN?

  • Earn practical experience while contributing to the wellness of the community through service learning, fieldwork, and clinical placements. Learn more about Clinical Education.
  • Learn from leading practitioners in the occupational therapy field.

CONTACT

School of Health Professions

Barry S. Eckert, Dean
Ph.D., FASAHP

718-780-6578
Barry.Eckert@liu.edu